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Nessie

Nessie
By Sophie 11 months ago 811 Views No comments

As the cool autumn wind whips through my hair, I glance over at the vast stretch of water. I could have sworn I heard a faint splash, but as I scan the calm ripples of dark water, my eyes start to struggle. There is such a vast body of water, it's impossible to take it in, in its entirety. This daunting loch is so large, my eyes begin to play tricks on me. It's also large enough for a monster to swim by before I've had time to catch her. The craggy backdrop casts its ominous reflection across the loch, adding more monster-like impressions, in the deep water.

Urquhart Castle on Loch Ness


My search for the Loch Ness monster is something that has existed for as long as I can remember. Family trips up north would see me splashing along the muddy banks of the loch in my bright red welly boots. I would cautiously search the water for the infamous monster I had heard so much about. Was it lonely? How long had it lived here? Why was it so shy? I needed to know, and I was sure that i would be that person. The one who watched the waters for long enough. The one who finally saw Nessie.

Possible Nessie sightings, both historical and recent


Legend has it that the Loch Ness monster is a giant, dinosaur-fish hybrid, that has swum the vast, 23 mile freshwater Loch, for 100s of years. Surfacing, only for split seconds throughout the centuries, to pose for a handful of photographs. There is an official Loch Ness Monster Sighting Register, for those lucky few to record their experience, and a worthy source of guidance for those in hunt of their own sighting. Scientists have studied the capability for such a monster to exist and have explored various avenues in search of an explanation. Although this could mean anything from a tree log, breaking the water surface, to a crocodile-fish hybrid, called a lake Sturgeon, my faith of this mystic beast's existence is not dampened.

Sturgeon Fish, found in Loch Ness



With more water in Loch Ness, than all the lakes in Scotland, England and Wales put together, it is no wonder that the existence of a historical water beast is a real possibility. The Loch is an impressive one, to one and a half, miles wide with a depth of 754 feet. Spanning almost 23 miles, this giant Loch holds many stories and secrets, and I am determined that Nessie is one of them. As motivation sets in, I grab my binoculars and head further down the Loch.

Loch Ness and Nessie are a large part of Scottish history and folklore. Thousands of tourists flock to the area every year with only one mission in mind. To catch a sighting of the Loch Ness Monster. Nessie aside, Loch Ness is a beautiful mix of craggy mountainous terrain, split by the dramatic dark waters of the loch. This area has a number of attractions and activities to offer. As we reach the end of September, we see Loch Ness hold its annual 5k and 10k marathons, as well as the annual international knit festival. This unique celebration of all things knitting, runs for four jam-packed days, from the 29th September. Find out more about this festival later in the week, where we discover how integral knitting and wool are to Scotland's history. Keep an eye out for out knitting-themed deal of the week, also coming later on!